Select a Location

Celtic for good times.

Hybrid / Mixed Beer Styles

Education: Other Styles

HYBRID/MIXED BEER STYLES:

Session Beer

Any style of beer can be made lower in strength than described in the classic style guidelines. The goal should be to reach a balance between the style's character and the lower alcohol content. Drinkability is a character in the overall balance of these beers.Beers in this category must not exceed 4.1% alcohol by weight (5.1% alcohol by volume).
 

American-Style Cream Ale or Lager

Mild, pale, light-bodied ale, made using a warm fermentation (top or bottom) and cold lagering. Hop bitterness and flavor range from very low to low. Hop aroma is often absent. Sometimes referred to as cream ales, these beers are crisp and refreshing. Pale malt character predominates. Caramelized malt character should be absent. A fruity or estery aroma may be perceived. Diacetyl and 
chill haze should not be perceived.
 

California Common Beer

California Common Beer is light amber to amber in color and is medium bodied. There is a noticeable degree of caramel-type malt character in flavor and often in aroma. Hop bitterness impression is medium to medium high and is balanced with a low to medium-low degree of fruity esters and malt character and give an impression of balance and drinkability. Hop flavor and aroma is low to medium-low. California Common Beer is a style of beer brewed with lager yeasts but at ale fermentation temperatures. 
 

Japanese Sake-Yeast Beer

A beer brewed with Sake yeast or Sake (koji) enzymes. Color depends on malts used. The unique flavor and aroma of the byproducts of sake yeast and/or koji enzymes should be distinctive and harmonize with the other malt and hop characters. Sake character may best be described as having mild fruitiness and a gentle and mild yeast extract-Vitamin B character. Hop bitterness, flavor and aroma should be low to medium and should harmonize with sake-like characters. High carbonation should be evident and a higher amount of alcohol may be evident. Body and mouth feel will vary depending on base style and original gravity. A slight chill haze is permissible.
 

Light American Wheat Ale or Lager with Yeast

This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent wheat malt, and hop rates may be low to medium. Hop characters may be light to moderate in bitterness, flavor and aroma. Fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Color is usually straw to light amber, and the body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Because this style is served with yeast the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel and appear hazy to very cloudy. Chill haze is also acceptable. Yeast flavor and aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of malt and hops. These beers are typically served 
with the yeast in the bottle, and are cloudy when served.
 

Light American Wheat Ale or Lager without Yeast

This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent wheat malt, and hop rates may be low to medium. Hop characters may be light to moderate in bitterness, flavor and aroma. A fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Appearance can be clear or with chill haze, golden to light amber, and the body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Because this style is packaged and served without yeast, no yeast characters should be evident in mouthfeel, flavor, or aroma. 
 

Fruit Wheat Ale or Lager with or without Yeast

This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent malted wheat. Fruit or fruit extracts contribute flavor and/or aroma. Perceived fruit qualities should be authentic and replicate true fruit complexity as much as possible.Color should reflect a degree of fruit’s color. Hop rates may be low to medium. Hop characters may be light to moderate in bitterness, flavor and aroma. Fruity-estery aroma and flavor from yeast can be typical but at low levels; however, phenolic, clovelike characteristics should not be perceived. Body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. When this style is served with yeast the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel and appear hazy to very cloudy. Chill haze is also acceptable. Yeast flavor and aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of malt and hops. Brewer may indicate on the bottle whether the yeast should be intentionally roused or if they prefer that the entry be poured as quietly as possible.
 

Dark American Wheat Ale or Lager with Yeast

This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent malt wheat, and hop rates may be low to medium. Fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels; however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Color is dark amber to dark brown, and the body should be light to medium in character. Roasted malts are optionally evident in aroma and flavor with a low level of roast malt astringency acceptable when appropriately balanced with malt sweetness. Roast malts may be evident as a cocoa/chocolate or caramel character. Aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters may be part of the overall flavor/aroma profile.
 

Rye Ale or Lager with or without Yeast

Rye beers can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It should be brewed with at least 20 percent rye malt, and low to medium perception of hop bitterness. Hop aroma and flavor can be low to medium-high. These are often versions of classic styles that contain noticeable rye character in balance with other qualities of the beer. A spicy, fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels; however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Color is straw to amber, and the body should belight to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. If this style is packaged and served without yeast, no yeast characters should be evident in mouthfeel, flavor, or aroma. A low level of tannin derived astringency may be perceived. If this style is served with yeast, the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel and appear hazy to very cloudy. Yeast flavor and aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of rye and barley malt and hops. Darker versions of this style will be dark amber to dark brown, and the body should be light to medium in character. Roasted malts are optionally evident in aroma and flavor with a low level of roast malt astringency acceptable when appropriately balanced with malt sweetness. Roast malts may be evident as a cocoa/chocolate or caramel character. Aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters may be part of the overall flavor/aroma profile.
 

Fruit Beer

Fruit beers are any beers using fruit or fruit extracts as an adjunct in either, the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, fruit qualities. Fruit qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. If a fruit (such as juniper berry) has an herbal or spice quality, it is more appropriate to consider it in the herb and spice beers category. Acidic bacterial (not wild yeast) fermentation characters may be evident (but not necessary) they would contribute to acidity and enhance fruity balance. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance.
 

Field Beer

Field beers are any beers using vegetables as an adjunct in either the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, qualities. Vegetable qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. If a vegetable (such as chili pepper) has an herbal or spice quality it should be classified as herb/spice beer category. A statement by the brewer explaining what vegetables are used is essential in order for fair assessment in competitions. If this beer is a classic style with vegetables, the brewer should also specify the classic style.
 

Pumpkin Beer

Pumpkin beers are any beers using pumpkins (Cucurbito pepo) as an adjunct in either mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, qualities. Pumpkin qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. These may or may not be spiced or flavored with other things. A statement by the brewer explaining the nature of the beer is essential for fair assessment in competitions. If this beer is a classic style with pumpkin, the brewer should also specify the classic style.
 

Chocolate/Cocoa-Flavored Beer

Chocolate beers use ―dark chocolate or cocoa in any of its forms other than or in addition to hops to create a distinct (ranging from subtle to intense) character. Under hopping allows chocolate to contribute to the flavor profile while not becoming excessively bitter.
 

Coffee-Flavored Beer

Coffee beers use coffee in any of its forms other than or in addition to hops to create a distinct (ranging from subtle to intense) character. Under hopping allows coffee to contribute to the flavor profile while not becoming excessively bitter.
 

Herb and Spice Beer

Herb beers use herbs or spices (derived from roots, seeds, fruits, vegetable, flowers, etc.) other than or in addition to hops to create a distinct (ranging from subtle to intense) character, though individual characters of herbs and/or spices used may not always be identifiable. Under hopping often, but not always, allows the spice or herb to contribute to the flavor profile. Positive evaluations are significantly based on perceived balance of flavors. 
 

Specialty Beer

These beers are brewed using unusual fermentable sugars, grains and starches that contribute to alcohol content other than, or in addition to, malted barley. Nuts generally have some degree of fermentables and therefore appropriately classified in this category. The distinctive characters of these special ingredients should be evident either in the aroma, flavor or overall balance of the beer, but not necessarily in overpowering quantities. For example, maple syrup or potatoes would be considered unusual. Rice, corn, or wheat are not considered unusual.
 

Specialty Honey Lager or Ale

These beers are brewed using honey in addition to malted barley. Beers may be brewed to a traditional style or may be experimental. Character of honey should be evident in flavor and aroma and balanced with the other components without overpowering them.
 

Gluten-Free Beer

A beer (lager, ale or other) that is made from fermentable sugars, grains and converted carbohydrates. Ingredients do not contain gluten, in other words zero gluten (No barley, wheat, spelt, oats, rye, etc). May or may not contain malted grains that do not contain gluten. Brewers design and identify these beers along other style guidelines with regard to flavor, aroma and appearance profile.
 

Smoke Beer (Lager or Ale)

Any style of beer can be smoked; the goal is to reach a balance between the style's character and the smoky properties. Type of wood or other sources of smoke should be specified as well as the style the beer is based upon.
 

Wood- and Barrel-Aged Beer

A wood- or barrel-aged beer is any lager, ale or hybrid beer, either a traditional style or a unique experimental beer that has been aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood. This beer is aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and/or other unique wood character, but wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood-flavors. Used sherry, rum, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Brewers when entering this category should specify type of barrel and/or wood used and any other special treatment or ingredients used.
 

Wood- and Barrel-Aged Pale to Amber Beer

Any classic style or unique experimental beer that has been aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood. This beer is aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and/or other unique wood character but wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood-flavors. Used sherry, rum, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Primary character of the beer style may or may not be apparent. 
 

Wood- and Barrel-Aged Dark Beer

Any classic style or unique experimental style of dark beer can be wood or barrel-aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood. This beer is aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and/or other unique wood character but wood-aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood-flavors. Used sherry, rum, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Primary character of the beer style may or may not be apparent. 
 

Wood- and Barrel-Aged Strong Beer

Any strong classic style or unique, experimental style of beer can be wood or barrel-aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood. This beer is aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character but wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood-flavors. Used sherry, rum, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Primary character of the beer style may or may not be apparent. 
 

Wood- and Barrel-Aged Sour Beer

A wood- or barrel-aged sour beer is any lager, ale or hybrid beer, either a traditional style or a unique experimental beer that has been aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood and has developed a bacterial induced natural acidity. This beer is aged in wood with the intention of introducing the micro flora present in the wood. Sometimes wood aging is intended to impart the particularly unique character of the wood, but wood-aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood-flavors.Wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character. Wood-derived character can also be characterized by flavors of the product that was in the barrel during prior use. These wood-derived flavors, if present in this style, can be very low in character and barely perceived or evident or assertive as wood-derived flavors. Any degree of woodderived flavors should be in balance with other beer character. Fruit and herb/spiced versions may take on the hue, flavors and aromas of added ingredients.  Usually bacteria and ―wild yeasts fermentation contributes complex esters and results in a dry to 
very dry beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of acidity, complex esters, and new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors.
 

Aged Beer (Ale or Lager)

Beers aged for over one year. Generally beers with high hopping rates, roast malt content, high alcohol content, complex herbal, smoke or fruit content (Wood aging, Brettanomyces characters and acidic beers must be classified or entered into other categories if that option is available), A brewer may brew any type of beer of any strength and enhance its character with extended and creative aging conditions. Beers in this category may be aged in bottles or any type of food grade vessel.
 

Other Strong Ale or Lager

Any style of beer can be made stronger than the classic style guidelines. The goal should be to reach a balance between the style's character and the additional alcohol. Refer to this guide when making styles stronger and appropriately identify the style created (for example: double alt, triple fest, or quadruple Pilsener).
 

Non-Alcoholic (Beer) Malt Beverages

Non-alcoholic (NA) malt beverages should emulate the character of a previously listed category/subcategory designation but without the alcohol (less than 0.5 percent). Non-alcoholic (beer) malt beverages will inherently have a profile lacking the complexity and balance of flavors which can be attributed to alcohol. They should accordingly not be assessed negatively for reasons related to the absence of alcohol.

 

Locations

View daily specials and a calendar of events by visiting our locations pages.

Connect With Us

Facebook icon
Flickr icon
Twitter icon